Oregon’s Legislature took a step Tuesday toward enshrining the right to health care in the state Constitution, a move that would be unprecedented in the United States but raises serious funding questions.

The House of Representatives’ 35-25 endorsement of the bill sends it to the state Senate, whose approval would put the proposed constitutional amendment on the ballot for Oregon voters in the November election. The move comes as the Trump administration has tried to dismantle former President Barack Obama’s health care law.

If the Senate passes the bill, voters would be asked to consider amending the state’s 160-year-old Constitution to declare: “It is the obligation of the state to ensure that every resident of Oregon has access to cost-effective, medically appropriate and affordable health care as a fundamental right.”

Powell pledges to remain alert to emerging stability risks: Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the global economy is recovering strongly for the first time in a decade, but the central bank needs to remain alert to any emerging risks to financial stability.

Powell said the central bank is in the process of “gradually” raising interest rates and trimming its massive holdings of Treasury bonds. Powell said the Fed is seeking to normalize its policies in a way that will extend the recovery and bolster its goals of achieving stable inflation and maximum employment.

“We will remain alert to any developing risks to financial stability,” Powell said.

Powell made the comments during a brief ceremonial swearing-in Tuesday.

Trump considering ‘all options’ on steel, aluminum imports: Weighing trade sanctions, President Donald Trump said Tuesday he’s “considering all options” to address an influx of cheap aluminum and steel imports into the United States.

In a meeting with lawmakers, the president said he would soon make a decision on whether to slap “tariffs and/or quotas” on aluminum and steel imports by arguing they pose a threat to national security.

But he listened as lawmakers made competing arguments on the trade cases. Some urged him to act swiftly to defend steel workers’ jobs while others warned it might start a trade war, affecting a broad array of jobs and industries.

“I look at it two ways. I want to keep prices down but I also want to make sure that we have a steel industry and an aluminum industry,” Trump said in the Cabinet Room.

— Associated Press