The long and winding road that leads to Cedar Creek High School is not just a design element. It’s also a homeland security “best practice” for all new school construction. Cedar Creek is the first high school in the state built using    the new security standards.  Architect David Fraytak said the goal is to integrate them into the building design so they are effective without being obvious.

“You’ll notice there is no direct access to the building,” he said. “The road intentionally goes around, and is winding to slow down the speed and access of vehicles.”

Other security standards at Cedar Creek include:

  • Brick walls and pillars at the entrance that can withstand being struck by a vehicle
  • All parking, driveways and roads are a specified distance from the building
  • Entrance/exit gates that can be closed
  • Offices of essential personnel (principal) not visible from the street
  • Two main security stations, with redundancy in the systems in case one goes down
  • Interior and exterior video surveillance cameras that cover entrances, loading areas, corridors and stairways, areas with poor visibility
  • Exterior and interior lighting sufficient to make security cameras most effective
  • Access to the roof and HVAC system restricted and secure

Diane D’Amico