GREEN BAY, Wis. - The Philadelphia Eagles, for whatever reason, seem more at home in other stadiums than they do at Lincoln Financial Field.

They earned their fifth victory in six road games Sunday, using Nick Foles' three touchdown passes to beat Green Bay 27-13 at legendary Lambeau Field.

The Eagles' 5-5 record includes a 5-1 mark in opposing stadiums. The last time they accomplished that feat was in 2004, the season they went to the Super Bowl.

"I don't have an explanation for it," coach Chip Kelly said. "Winning is very difficult on the road."

With only two more road games remaining, however - at Minnesota on Dec. 15 and at Dallas on Dec. 29 - the Eagles need to find a way to win at home if they are to have any shot at reaching the playoffs for the first time since 2010.

They will enter next next Sunday's rematch with Washington at the Linc having lost a franchise-record 10 straight games there dating to last season, including an 0-4 mark this year.

"This was a big win for us today," linebacker DeMeco Ryans said. "But we're looking to get a home win now. It's been a long time coming, and we definitely need to give our fans something to cheer about."

That could happen if Foles continues to play at a sky-high level.

He completed 12 of 18 passes for 228 yards against the Packers with three touchdown passes and no interceptions in his second straight start in place of the injured Michael Vick. For the season, he has thrown 16 TD passes and no interceptions. In NFL history, only Denver quarterback Peyton Manning, who began this season with 20 TD passes before his first interception, has ever gotten off to a better start.

Considering the way Foles played in the last two games, throwing 10 touchdown passes with no interceptions, Kelly is going to be hard-pressed to put Vick back on the field once his strained left hamstring heals.

"I'm not worried about it," Foles said. "That's up to Coach Kelly and whatever decision he makes, I'll respect it. I love my teammates, I love this city and I love this organization. Whatever the situation is, I'll be there to support whoever is on the field."

The Pro Football Hall of Fame won't be asking for Foles' jersey and cleats, as it did last week after he passed for seven touchdowns, but he still turned in a pretty impressive performance. He hit wide receiver DeSean Jackson with a 55-yard pass in the first quarter and later found wide receiver Riley Cooper for a pair of TDs from 45 and 32 yards away.

Running back LeSean McCoy broke out of his slump by rushing for 155 yards on 25 carries. He regained the NFL lead in rushing with 932 yards.

"I think the offensive line really controlled the line of scrimmage," McCoy said. "It's one thing for a back to be confident running the ball, but when the guys up front want to run more than you do, that says a lot about the guys up front. They got it done in a big way.

The offensive line dominated despite losing four-time Pro Bowl tackle Jason Peters to a quadriceps injury in the first half. Allen Barbre, who spent three seasons (2007-09) with the Packers, stepped in at left tackle and played well.

Peters was among three Eagles starters to leave with injuries in the first quarter, joining linebacker Mychal Kendricks (sprained knee) and safety Earl Wolff (sprained knee). Najee Goode and Patrick Chung filled in for them.

"You have to be ready to play at any given time," Goode said. "Things happen in this league and you have to be prepared."

But the Packers were hurt worse.

Star quarterback Aaron Rodgers missed the game after sustaining a broken collarbone last Monday against Chicago. Backup Seneca Wallace lasted just one series Sunday before sustaining a strained groin, forcing the Packers to turn to third-stringer Scott Tolzien.

Tolzien, who was just promoted from the practice squad last week, completed 24 of 39 passes for 280 yards and a touchdown but also threw two interceptions.

"It's not just a cliche' when someone says you should prepare every week like you're the starter," Tolzien said. "You've got to take that to heart, put it on your own shoulders and make sure you're doing that."

The Lambeau crowd also made things a little easier for the Eagles.

Unlike the fans last week at Oakland's O.co Coliseum, Packers supporters weren't all that intimidating. While they saved their loudest cheers for the Packers, they didn't seem all that angry when the Eagles scored.

"Lambeau Field is a special place," Kelly said. "Most of the places we go into, we don't have fans clapping for us."

Contact David Weinberg:

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