PHILADELPHIA - Robin Thicke's song "Blurred Lines" blared from the loudspeakers as Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson made a leaping, 60-yard catch on a pass from Nick Foles on Friday.

Minutes later, offensive linemen worked on their footwork to the tune of the "Cha Cha Shuffle."

But, no, they did not take "two steps to the left, two steps to the right, two hops this time."

Aside from the players sporting green, white and red jerseys, there was very little similarity between Eagles coach Chip Kelly's first training camp practice Friday and those conducted by predecessor Andy Reid.

For one, the location was different. The Eagles now train at the NovaCare Complex after spending the previous 17 camps at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa. Instead of driving back to dormitories, the rookies were bused to a nearby hotel afterward while some veterans headed to their in-season homes.

"It's great being here," linebacker/defensive end Trent Cole said Friday. "Don't get me wrong, I have some fond memories from Lehigh, but this is home for us and we actually get to go to our homes at night. It's great."

The crowd size was also different. Friday's practice was viewed by approximately 300 invited guests and 50 season-ticket holders in contrast to the 6,000 or so fans who used to cram the stands at Lehigh's practice fields each day.

The spectators included Lower Township native Lou McCullough, who was invited by a friend who received two VIP passes.

"I was working on a yacht in Cape May when he asked me if I wanted to go," McCullough said while assistant coaches brandished fly swatters to disrupt the quarterbacks' passing lanes. "I never had the chance to go to Lehigh, so I wasn't going to pass this up.

"It's definitely interesting. I'm liking the new approach. It seems like the players have a little more energy, even the seasoned vets. No one is going through the motions."

All 90 players were on the field at the start of practice, even undrafted rookies Matthew Tucker (running back) and Brad Wing (punter). They were forced to sit out the rookie workout earlier in the week after failing their conditioning test, but they passed Thursday, as did the other 88 players.

Kelly praised their conditioning as a reason why he was able to conduct Friday's practice at such a fast, frenetic pace.

"The fact that everybody passed the test tells me the guys were very serious about the way they trained in the offseason," Kelly said. "I don't care if it was a 10-year veteran or a rookie, if they didn't pass that conditioning test, they weren't going to practice."

Of course, much of the attention was centered on the quarterbacks. Michael Vick and Foles split the repetitions with the first-team offense while onlookers scrutinized every throw. Rookie Matt Barkley got off to a solid start, while Dennis Dixon and G.J. Kine got some action with the backups.

While fans are eager to know who is going to be start the opening game at Washington on Sept. 9, Kelly is in no hurry to decide.

"It's still early," Kelly said. "I want to see these guys make the right decisions with the football and execute the offense and I want to see them do it in the heat of battle. A lot of quarterbacks can stand their and look pretty in red jerseys (that signify non-contact)."

Whoever wins the job will be protected by one of the best left tackles in the NFL.

Six-time Pro Bowler Jason Peters was back on the field Friday after missing the entire 2012 preseason and regular season because of a twice-ruptured Achilles' tendon.

"I'm just glad to be back out here after missing a year," Peters said. "It felt good today. I was a little rusty, but that's why you go to training camp. I'm going to work on it every day and try to get better. I'm going to go full tilt. There's no need to monitor anything. The doctor said there are no limits, so I'm just going to go all out.

"I'm the same player I was before. But that's not even my goal. My goal is to get a division championship and go deep in the playoffs."

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