Member of The Press sports staff since 1986, currently in my 23rd season as The Press Eagles' beat writer. Also cover boxing, MMA, golf, high school sports and everything else.

It’s weird how things work out sometimes.

Had Minnesota quarterback Teddy Bridgewater not suffered a season-ending — and even career-threatening — knee injury Aug. 30, Sunday’s Eagles-Vikings game wouldn’t be such a big deal.

But it’s huge.

Sam Bradford vs. Carson Wentz.

The Bradford Bus against the Wentz Wagon.

And I thought NASCAR Sprint Cup races were exciting.

It’s happening because of a trade that helped both teams.

That’s the case with the deal Sept. 3 that saw the Eagles send Bradford to Minnesota in exchange for a first-round draft pick in 2017 and a conditional fourth-rounder in 2018.

The Vikings, who viewed themselves as Super Bowl contenders, desperately needed someone to replace Bridgewater.

The Eagles were looking for a way to get back into the first round of next year’s draft, which is being held in Philadelphia, while also clearing a path for Wentz.

Problems solved.

Bradford, who correctly thought his future in Philly was doomed anyway, is off to a terrific start for the Vikings. It took him all of about 10 minutes to learn Minnesota’s offensive system. Bradford has completed 70.4 percent of his passes while throwing for 990 yards and six touchdowns without an interception in four starts. His 109.7 rating is second-highest in the NFC behind Atlanta’s Matt Ryan (117.9)

More impressively, he’s succeeding without running back Adrian Peterson (torn meniscus) and starting tackles Matt Kalil (hip surgery) and Andre Smith (torn triceps).

Good for him.

I’m glad to see that Bradford doing well, considering the way the Eagles treated him. Some fans complained about his decision to boycott part of the voluntary offseason workouts, but I didn’t blame him for feeling hurt, considering he was betrayed.

He could have left during free agency, but chose to stay in Philly because he was led to believe he would at least have an opportunity for a future there.

That was gone the minute the Eagles drafted Wentz.

The trade has also worked out well from the Eagles’ standpoint, though I admittedly thought it was the wrong move at the time.

Trading away your starting quarterback eight days before the first game of the regular season just made no sense, regardless of the potential windfall.

But Wentz’s potential is undeniable, and maybe it’s better to let him learn on the job than to languish on the bench.

Like any rookie, Wentz is going to have his rough patches — he struggled in Sunday’s loss at Washington — but has provided glimpses of greatness.

The Vikings have a chance to ride the Bradford Bus all the way to Houston for the Super Bowl.

But first comes an exciting race against the Wentz Wagon.

I just hope there isn’t a crash.

(David Weinberg’s Extra Points column appears Wednesdays and Sundays in The Press.)



Twitter @pressacweinberg