Philadelphia Phillies closer Jonathan Papelbon admitted Sunday in a report on ESPN.com that he and several other players on the Boston Red Sox were given a legal anti-inflammatory drug, the use of which has become increasingly controversial in sports.

Papelbon said the Red Sox's medical staff injected him with Toradol, a nonsteroidal drug, several times between 2007 and 2011.

Papelbon told ESPN.com that he couldn't recall who introduced him to the drug, but he believes that he first starting receiving it in 2007, when he was Boston's closer the year they won the World Series.

"It was kind of a word-of-mouth thing," he told ESPN.com. "You got in the clubhouse and said, 'Man, I feel like crap,' and somebody would say, 'Oh, you should get a Toradol shot.' All players talk about what gets you through a 162-game season."

Papelbon said that when he was given a physical by the Phillies prior to signing as a free agent after the 2011 season, doctors asked him if he used Toradol. When he said yes, he was told that he would have to stop because the team didn't do that.

Papelbon, speaking from the Phillies' spring-training camp in Clearwater, Fla., said he was surprised by the Phillies' decision, but has not had a shot since.

Toradol has raised concerns lately among medical experts due to the side effects of long-term use. Recent articles have tied long-term use to gastrointestinal bleeding.