For The Press

Combine roasted cauliflower with chickpeas and coconut milk, season with curry powder and you have a delightful way to eat this cancer-preventive crucifer.

Roasting cauliflower causes its natural sugars to caramelize, which brings out a more delicate nutty flavor and keeps it more formed, not mushy and water logged as often happens when steamed or boiled. The combination of roasted cauliflower and tomatoes with sauteed onions and garlic, wilted baby spinach and chickpeas produces a wonderful garden flavor. The chickpeas contribute their own nutty flavor and a crunchy texture while providing health-promoting fiber and plant-based protein. Using reduced-fat coconut milk gives this curry dish a creamy quality without the extra calories and fat found in regular coconut milk.

Curry connotes dishes and sauces made with a mixture of pungent spices, usually turmeric, cumin, coriander, fenugreek, ginger, garlic and chilies. Common in India and South Asian countries, curry dishes vary from country to country, even within country regions. Curry colors range from yellow, red, green to brown and the amount of spices used, as few as five to more than 20, also varies.

Curry powder is a mixture of spices commonly found in curries and is said to be an invention of the British who wanted to replicate Indian cuisine they enjoyed during the British Raj.

Most curry powders include turmeric, which gives curries their yellow color.

Curcumin is the compound in turmeric that gives it its golden hue and is showing promise as an anti-cancer and anti-inflammation phytochemical.

This curry dish is perfect as a side dish or ideal as a light vegetarian lunch or dinner when served over a bed of brown rice. Using a whole head of cauliflower makes for a lot of curry, so enjoy with a large group or as leftovers either reheated or served cold.