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Tribune News Service

Business Budget for December 2, 2019

Updated at 4:30 a.m. EDT (0930 UTC)

This budget is now available at TribuneNewsService.com, with direct links to stories and art. See details at the end of the budget.

^TOP STORIES<

^Why 'Frozen' and 'Star Wars' matter so much to toy makers this holiday season<

^RETAIL-FROZEN-STARWARS:LA—<As this summer wound down, Hasbro Inc. was feverishly ramping up for the winter holidays.

The toy maker added air-freight services and shifted its warehousing operations to get toys based on two new Walt Disney Co. movies, "Frozen 2" and "Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker," to retailers in time for the holiday shopping season.

The toy launches were "critically important," and the company hustled to "ensure shelves were stocked" ahead of the opening of "Frozen 2" in theaters in late November and the "Star Wars" opening Dec. 20, Hasbro Chief Executive Brian Goldner told analysts last month.

1500 by James F. Peltz. MOVED

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^Why TV networks may be afraid of investigative stories<

TV-NETWORKS-INVESTIGATIONS:LA — This has been the autumn of discontent for investigative TV journalists.

Ronan Farrow's best-selling book "Catch and Kill" detailed his frustration with former bosses at NBC News over his failed attempt to break the story on the sexual assault and harassment allegations against movie mogul Harvey Weinstein. A month later, leaked video showed ABC's "20/20" co-anchor Amy Robach grousing over how the network would not run a 2015 interview with a victim of billionaire pedophile Jeffrey Epstein that implicated Prince Andrew and former President Bill Clinton.

In both cases the networks said the stories never reached the editorial standard they believed was necessary to put it on the air.

But the dissatisfaction Farrow and Robach expressed reflects a deepening concern by some veteran journalists and producers that network TV news divisions are avoiding controversial enterprise stories that could pose financial risks from litigation and create aggravation for their corporate owners.

1800 (with trims) by Stephen Battaglio in Los Angeles. (Moved as a national story.) MOVED

PHOTOS

^Criticism mounts as 'peak' season for Amazon arrives<

AMAZON-CRITICISM:SE — As Amazon ramps up to its holiday "peak," scrutiny and criticism of the company is becoming more strategic, widespread and coordinated.

1050 by Benjamin Romano in Seattle. MOVED

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^PERSONAL FINANCE AND INVESTING STORIES<

^Giving Tuesday: How to donate to charity directly from your retirement account and save on taxes<

^PFP-GIVING-TUESDAY:PH—<If you're the right age and plan to give to charity, here's one great way to amplify your gift.

Generally, those over 70 1/2 have until year's end to take required money out of their Individual Retirement Accounts. It's called required minimum distribution, and it must be taken.

Instead of withdrawing and paying income tax, however, you can send up to $100,000 untaxed directly to charity.

600 by Erin Arvedlund. MOVED

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^<

^DAILY MARKETS GRAPHIC <

Find here a daily Wall Street roundup graphic featuring Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500 and Nasdaq data.

The 1-column x 4-inch graphic, Wall Street, will be posted by 6:30 p.m. EDT Monday through Friday.

To find the graphic, visit the Graphics section of TribuneNewsService.com.

Those with questions regarding the graphic should contact the graphics team at 312-222-4131 or tydavis@tribpub.com.

^COLUMNS<

^Michael Hiltzik: This government price-fixing case makes the tuna industry sound like the mafia<

^HILTZIK-COLUMN:LA—<Speaking as a lifelong aficionado of the tuna fish sandwich on rye, I was relieved to learn that Bumble Bee's Nov. 21 bankruptcy filing wouldn't mean the eradication of the brand from store shelves — it would merely come under new ownership.

Yet there's much more to it than that. The bankruptcy filing is an outgrowth of a price-fixing case that makes tuna processing seem a lot wilder and more colorful on dry land than it is at sea.

1600 by Michael Hiltzik. MOVED

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^<

These features regularly move on Monday:

^Susan Tompor: How to protect your money from online crooks while holiday shopping<

^PFP-TOMPOR-COLUMN:DE—<As shoppers whip out the plastic for online deals, the holiday angst only heightens when it comes to threats to your credit card accounts and other personal information.

Even consumers who shop online through a major retailer, like Macy's, can fall victim to some of these incredible hacking incidents.

1100 by Susan Tompor. MOVED

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^KIDS AND MONEY<

^Kids and Money: Practical concepts to teach kids about economics<

^PFP-KIDSANDMONEY:MCT—<Junior Achievement, which relies on a small army of volunteer instructors to teach kids about economics and entrepreneurship, is trying a new way to bring those concepts to life.

The 100-year-old organization started rolling out curriculum this fall that uses technology and textbooks to make basic economic concepts more relatable to high school and middle school students.

650 by Steve Rosen. MOVED

^<

(EDITORS: The Steve Rosen column is syndicated through Tribune Content Agency. The column is not a part of your News Service subscription. To use this column, you must purchase the rights to it from Tribune Content Agency. Please call Rick DeChantal at either 800-245-6536, ext. 4544 or at 312-222-4544.)

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