Cape May Bird Observatory’s Monarch Monitoring Project got a report from Journey North this week that 20 butterflies tagged by the group last fall have been spotted or recovered, half in Mexico and half along the U.S. East Coast.

Of the 10 recovered in Mexico, eight were in the El Rosario Reserve and two in the Cerro Pelon Reserve. They were recovered from Dec. 4, 2017, through March 18 and reported to Journey North, a nonprofit group that provides the tags and tracks the monarch migration through them and through visual reports of citizen scientists at learner.org/jnorth/.

A group from CMBO, a branch of New Jersey Audubon, visited those two reserves and a third this winter. A slideshow of highlights of the trip is at www.mgnature.com/mgnature/Mexico18.html.

Of the 10 recovered along the East Coast, four were found in Maryland, two in Virginia, one in North Carolina, two in Florida and one in Louisiana. There was also one found in Bayonne, Hudson County, which means it flew north for some reason. They were found from Sept. 21 through Dec. 6, and the one seen Dec. 6 in Apopka, Florida, was laying eggs.

Steelman Bay marshlands get cleanup from Patcong Creek Foundation: More than 60 volunteers with the Patcong Creek Foundation celebrated Earth Day with a cleanup of Steelman Bay’s marshlands, on the eastern border of Somers Point last week.

They picked up everything from tiny cigarette butts to massive styrofoam pieces of floating dock, the organization said.

Atlantic County Board of Chosen Freeholders Chairperson Frank Formica and Vice-Chairperson Maureen Kern participated, along with Mayor Jack Glasser and Councilmen Ron Meischker and James Toto.

Two Somers Point Cub Scout packs — Pack 87 and Pack 55 — came out in big numbers, along with representatives of Ocean City Troop 32, the group said.

In an hour and a half, volunteers collected 20 cubic yards of trash and recycling, the foundation said.

Hunters Helping the Hungry donate venison: Hunters Helping the Hungry donated at least 661 deer to those in need in 2017-2018.

“This amounted to 25,730 pounds of venison to feed the hungry — over 102,000 meals,” the group announced. “We are now almost 1.8 million meals since inception.”

— Michelle Brunetti Post

Contact: 609-272-7219

mpost@pressofac.com

Twitter @MichelleBPost

Facebook.com/EnvironmentSouthJersey

Staff Writer

In my first job after college got paid to read the New York Times and summarize articles for an early online data base. First reporting job was with The Daily Record in Parsippany. I have also worked in nonprofits, and have been with The Press since 1990.

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