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Question: I will be moving to California in several months and am selling many household items gathered for years at yard, garage and home sales. Among the things is an unusual 9 3/4-inches high and 9-inches wide round vase with a multi-ring neck. It is decorated with dark green flowers and black flame shapes against a light green background. Although it is not marked, the seller sold it to me for $12 as a “Roseville 1920s piece.” Any information you can provide about “Roseville,” the vase and its present value, if any, is appreciated. — T.Y., Glassboro

Answer: “Roseville” refers to the Roseville Pottery Corporation founded by George F. Young in 1890 at Roseville, Ohio. Initially a maker of utility stoneware, the company eventually opened two plants in Zanesville, Ohio, where the manufacture of art pottery began in 1900.

The firm’s top designers’ production of lavish, hand-decorated art lines soon earned Roseville early 20th-century awards for its innovative designs as well as unusual glazes. Within a few years, Roseville hired hundreds of workers to produce thousands of pieces each day.

Eventually, interest in popular Roseville lines enhanced with ornate decoration or embossed flower patterns with a matte finish faded and the company closed in 1954.

However, by the mid-1990s, Roseville pottery had become highly collectible, and its 1928 Art Deco style Futura line was a favorite.

At that time, your Futura Black Flame pattern vase decorated with blended Art Deco and floral designs became a sought-after collectible.

This year, prices paid for two Futura Black Flame vases like yours ranged from $420 to $495 each, based on condition.

Question: I recently bought an interesting 11½-inch high Barbie-type plastic doll at a house sale. Tagged as “Petroliana Texaco Cheerleader Doll,” she has a movable head, arms and legs, wears a short, pleated white skirt, red sweater and came with a leatherette coat and cotton dress. I paid $25 for the set and wonder if I paid too much. Also, what is Petroliana? — W.N., Northfield

Answer: Your plastic and vinyl doll is a promotional piece offered as a premium to folks who bought gas at Texaco gas stations. She debuted in 1973.

Founded in 1902 as Texas Fuel Company by Joseph Cullinan and Arnold Schlaet, the partners struck oil and eventually entered the service station business. Advertised on radio and TV by Texaco spokesperson Bob Hope, Texaco service stations soon were located in every American state.

Petroliana refers to antiques and collectibles related to old gas stations and items associated with the oil business including gas pumps, advertising, road maps, tin signs, promotional pieces and other things with connections to the petroleum industry. Collecting Petroliana has been a popular hobby for many years.

A mint-in-box Texaco Cheerleader Doll sold for $52 this year.

Alyce Hand Benham is an antiques broker, appraiser and estate-liquidation specialist. Send questions to: Alyce Benham, Living section, The Press of Atlantic City, 1000 W. Washington Ave., Pleasantville, NJ 08232. Email: treasuresbyalyce81@hotmail.com. Letters may be used in future columns but cannot be answered individually, and photos cannot be returned.

Alyce Hand Benham is an antiques broker, appraiser and estate-liquidation specialist. Send questions to: Alyce Benham, Living section, The Press of Atlantic City, 1000 W. Washington Ave., Pleasantville, NJ 08232. Email: treasuresbyalyce81@hotmail.com. Letters may be used in future columns but cannot be answered individually, and photos cannot be returned.

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